Across Property Lines: Textual Ownership in Writing Groups by Candace Spigelman

By Candace Spigelman

Candace Spigelman investigates the dynamics of possession in small workforce writing workshops, basing her findings on case stories concerning teams: a five-member artistic writing workforce assembly per thirty days at a neighborhood Philadelphia espresso bar and a four-member college-level writing crew assembly of their composition school room. She explores the connection among specific notions of highbrow estate inside of each one crew in addition to the effectiveness of writing teams that embody those notions. Addressing the negotiations among the private and non-private domain names of writing inside of those teams, she discovers that for either the dedicated writers and the newcomers, “values linked to textual possession play a vital position in writing team performance.”

           

Spigelman discusses textual possession, highbrow estate, and writing team methods after which reports theories when it comes to authorship and data making. After introducing the individuals in each one staff, discussing their texts, and describing their workshop periods, she examines the writers’ avowed and implied ideals approximately replacing principles and retaining person estate rights.

           

Spigelman stresses the mandatory stress among person and social points of writing practices: She argues for the necessity to foster extra collaborative job between pupil writers by way of replicating the techniques of writers operating in nonacademic settings but additionally contends that every one writers needs to be allowed to visualize their person company and authority as they compose. 

Show description

Read Online or Download Across Property Lines: Textual Ownership in Writing Groups PDF

Best rhetoric books

Everyday Writing Center: A Community of Practice

In a landmark collaboration, 5 co-authors strengthen a subject of standard disruptions ("the everyday") as a resource of provocative studying moments which may free up either pupil writers and writing heart employees. whilst, the authors parlay Etienne Wenger’s suggestion of "community of practice" into an ethos of a dynamic, learner-centered pedagogy that's specially well-suited to the ordinary instructing scenario of the writing middle.

Across Property Lines: Textual Ownership in Writing Groups

Candace Spigelman investigates the dynamics of possession in small workforce writing workshops, basing her findings on case stories concerning teams: a five-member inventive writing crew assembly per thirty days at a neighborhood Philadelphia espresso bar and a four-member college-level writing workforce assembly of their composition lecture room.

Mutuality in the Rhetoric and Composition Classroom

In Mutuality within the Rhetoric and Composition school room, David L. Wallace and Helen Rothschild Ewald indicate the centrality of rhetoric within the academy, saying the intimate connection among language and information making. additionally they pressure the necessity for a metamorphosis within the roles of lecturers and scholars in today’s lecture room.

Additional info for Across Property Lines: Textual Ownership in Writing Groups

Sample text

Often, writers ¤nd in the deadlines of regular meetings the positive discipline to remain productive. Further, writing groups may serve as sources of publication information and advice and as forums for public presentation to larger audiences. Writing teachers promote groups primarily to help students become better writers. Peer groups offer student writers a genuine audience that can ask for clari¤cation, point to discursive gaps, ¤nd errors, and provide purposes for writing beyond performance and evaluation.

Furthermore, in the early decades of this century, John Dewey in®uenced progressive educators to create student-centered classrooms that invested in the relationship of the child to the group (see Democracy and The School and Society). 13 Today, many ¤rst-year students arrive at college with experience in peer review, writing groups, and other kinds of collaborative learning. Likewise, college students may be introduced to some of these activities in classes such as anthropology (Herrington and Cadman), education (Spear), or philosophy (Fishman and McCarthy).

In order to discuss a work, the reader will need to employ the writer’s words and phrases, what Bakhtin terms speaking an “alien” discourse. At the same time, the reader will color those words with his or her own signi¤cations and intentions (355). Notably, the con®ict between speakers’ and listeners’ meanings frequently leads to synthesis—the creation of new meanings: “Within the arena of almost every utterance,” Bakhtin explains, “an intense interaction and struggle between one’s own and another’s word is being waged, a process in which they oppose or dialogically interanimate each other” (354, my emphasis).

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.24 of 5 – based on 3 votes